Teens With Type 1 Diabetes Less Likely Than Younger Children to Carry Some Blood Sugar Management Supplies

-Craig Idlebrook

Researchers have found that teens with type 1 diabetes might be less prepared for on-the-go blood sugar management than their younger peers.

For the study, researchers sent out a survey on blood sugar management practices when away from home to participants with the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. They then divided-up the results of the completed survey into three different age groups and examined the results.

The researchers found teens with type 1 diabetes were less likely than those between the ages of 6 years old and 12 years old to carry certain diabetes supplies. The results were presented this past week at the American Diabetes Association 79th Scientific Sessions in San Francisco.

When compared to children ages 6 years old to 12 years old, teens with type 1 diabetes were:

-17% less likely than the next youngest age group to carry a glucagon kit all or most of the time.

-10% less likely to carry rapid-acting carbs all or most of the time.

-6% less likely than the next youngest age group to carry rapid-acting insulin all or most of the time.

When it comes to diabetes technology, teens were:

-14% less likely to carry a CGM receiver all or most of the time.

-8% less likely to carry an extra infusion set all or time of the time.

The researchers say that such data point to the need to help families balance a teen’s need for autonomy with their ability to be prepared for blood sugar management emergencies.

You can read more about T1D Exchange-related research at the ADA 79th Scientific Sessions here. 

Want more type 1 diabetes-related news stories, and the chance to help type 1 diabetes research? Take a moment to join T1D Exchange Glu now by clicking here.

 

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